11 Results

Type

Item

Collection

Ascribed Culture

Date

Gender

Material

Object Type

Original/Reproduction

Style

Tag

  • No Matches
Viking Objects

Reproduction Equal-Armed Brooch

A reproduction of an equal-armed brooch in the Borre style found in Nottinghamshire. This style of brooch is known from Birka in Sweden, suggesting trade contacts or individuals from Birka arriving in the East Midlands.

Read More
Viking Names

Ref

Refr is a fairly common male name in the Viking world. It is found in two Swedish runic inscriptions and may originally have been a nickname, as it means ‘fox’. It forms the first element of Revesby, Lincolnshire.

Read More
Viking Names

Blesi

The male name Blesi is found in two Swedish runic inscriptions and is also recorded as the name of one of the original settlers of Iceland. It was originally a by-name, meaning ‘blaze, white spot on a horse’s forehead’.

Read More
Viking Objects

Fragment of an Equal-Armed Brooch

A fragment of a Viking Age equal-armed brooch found at Harworth Bircotes, Nottinghamshire. This fragment is the boss of the brooch and resembles brooches found at Birka, Sweden.

Read More
Viking Names

Tofi

The name Tófi is very common in the Viking Age, though mostly in Sweden and Denmark. It forms the first element of the place-name Toton, Nottinghamshire.

Read More
Viking Names

Thorfast

Þorfastr is a common male name in the eastern part of the Viking world – it is common in Swedish runic inscriptions and is even found in the inscription on a rune-stone fragment found in Finland, as well as a couple of Danish ones, but it does not occur in any Norwegian or Icelandic texts. It can be found in the runic inscription on the Lincoln comb-case.

Read More
Viking Names

Gunnhild

Gunnhildr is a very common female name throughout the Viking world. In England, the name has a particularly wide geographical distribution that extends beyond the Danelaw and beyond the Viking Age. Its popularity was most likely influenced by its use in the Danish royal family in the eleventh century, when it was borne by an aunt, a daughter and a niece of King Cnut.

Read More
Viking Names

Kati

Káti is a fairly common male personal name in the Viking world, occurring in the inscriptions on at least six Swedish rune-stones. It  is the first element in the place-name Caythorpe, Nottinghamshire. There are also several place-names in Lincolnshire which contain this name, including Cadeby and Caythorpe. The name may originally have been a nickname, as it means ‘the cheerful one’.

Read More
Viking Names

Svein

The Old Norse male name Sveinn was one of the commonest in Scandinavia, particularly in Denmark and Sweden, where it is recorded in many runic inscriptions. It occurs as the first element in the Lincolnshire place-name of Swinethorpe. Early forms of this name confirm that it is nothing to do with swine, but rather contains this name. The name continued in use in both Lincolnshire and Yorkshire well into the thirteenth century. It was famously the name of the father of King Knútr, later king of all England. Sveinn was known as ‘Forkbeard’ and died in Gainsborough, Lincolnshire, in 1014 according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.

Read More
Viking Names

Stari

Stari  (also Starri) is mainly found in Iceland, though there is one in a Swedish rune-stone inscription and it has been suggested as the first element in Staythorpe, Nottinghamshire. It derives from a by-name meaning ‘one who stares’.

Read More
Viking Names

Ulf

Úlfr is a very common name throughout Scandinavia, meaning ‘wolf’. It is also frequent in England, occurring both independently as in place-names like Ulceby. While Old English has a personal name element Wulf, common in compound names such as Wulfstan, it is very rarely used on its own as a monothematic name, unlike the Old Norse cognate. The Old Norse name can also be found as both the first and second element in compound names, such as Úlfgeirr or Þórulfr.

Read More