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Viking Objects

Coin of Cnut the Great (LEIC-4B7888)

This Short Cross Type silver penny was minted in the name of King Cnut between 1024 and 1030 in the Derby mint by the moneyer Swartinc. The location of discovery is unknown. Minting coins was a way of controlling the means of exchange within a kingdom and which created a more easily administered standardized system of trade. Moreover, the coins themselves were often used as propaganda, portaying symbols and statements that gave off a desired message. The Vikings later used the minting of coins to legitimize their own rule.

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Viking Objects

Coin of Cnut the Great (LEIC-3E8CC4)

This silver Helmet IIIc Type penny was minted for King Cnut of England in London. The obverse inscription reads CNVTREXANG while the obverse reads EADPOLD ON LVND. Minting coins was a way of controlling the means of exchange within a kingdom and which created a more easily administered standardized system of trade. Moreover, the coins themselves were often used as propaganda, portaying symbols and statements that gave off a desired message. The Vikings later used the minting of coins to legitimize their own rule.

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Viking Objects

Clench Nail (NLM-2FC690)

Clench nails were used in clinker-style ship-building from the 7th century to the 15th and also for domestic purposes, in which clench nails might appear where ship timber has been reused. Clinker ship-building involved building the ship’s hull first out of layered planks attached to the keel and held together using clench nails. Clinker-built boats and ships are particularly associated with the Vikings.

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Viking Objects

Sword Pommel (NARC-E7AAF4)

An  Anglo-Scandinavian copper-alloy sword pommel classed as a Petersen L type VI.  The design is a fusion of Anglo-Scandinavian and Anglo-Saxon fashions. In many cases the design of the sword pommel is the only method of identifying the possible type and date of the sword it was attached to.

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Viking Objects

Copper-Alloy Disc Brooch (LEIC-782CD2)

This Anglo-Scandinavian copper-alloy disc brooch has small traces of silvering on both surfaces. It is decorated in Borre-style interlaced knotwork matching the East Anglian type II. For more information on Scandinavian jewellery in England check out our blog: Brooches, Pendants and Pins: Scandinavian Dress Accessories in England.

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Viking Objects

Stirrup Mount (LEIC-AF8883)

This copper-alloy stirrup-strap mount is decorated with an unusual geometric pattern with incised lines running across its surface. It has been classified as a Williams Class A Type 8, but is probably a hybrid.

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Viking Objects

Scabbard Fitting (LIN-3DE8C7)

This chape, proabably meant for a knife scabbard, has an openwork abstract zoomorphic form representing a winged beast in profile.

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Viking Objects

Anglo-Scandinavian Strap-End (LEIC-0C2B81)

This example of an Anglo-Scandinavian copper-alloy strap-end displays foliate decoration and features a mixture of the Anglo-Saxon Winchester style and Anglo-Scandinavian zoomorphic heads. It is classified as Thomas Class E, Type 1.

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Viking Objects

Drinking-Horn Terminal (LIN-F0DD46)

This probable drinking horn terminal has a hollow conical socket with three rivet-holes at the attachment end. The socket is ribbed and at the top it has an integral animal head in the form of a mythical creature, most likely a dragon.

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Viking Objects

Stirrup-Strap Mount (BH-D273BF)

This copper-alloy stirrup strap mount is classed as a Williams Class B Type 2 and is decorated with an openwork zoomorphic design.

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Viking Objects

Coin of Cnut the Great (DENO-28F8A6)

This silver penny is a posthumous issue of Cnut, with arm and sceptre obverse type, minted by Thurgrim in Lincoln under the authority of King Harthacnut. Minting coins was a way of controlling the means of exchange within a kingdom and which created a more easily administered standardized system of trade. Moreover, the coins themselves were often used as propaganda, portaying symbols and statements that gave off a desired message. The Vikings later used the minting of coins to legitimize their own rule.

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